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Our Fat Fact Sheet!

Posted on March 8th 2018 by

Our Fat Fact Sheet!

It's Nutrition Month here at LED!


Nutrition advice is part of your LED Unlimited Membership and our Fitness Team are on hand to help you understand and create positive changes

One of the biggest talking points that our teams come accross is the debate about fat and there is so much confusion around “good” and “bad” fats. So here is our list of 20 fats we consider to be “good” and why

Please remember that as always portion control is key!

1. Avocados


One medium avacado has approximately 23 grams of fat, but it is primarily monounsaturated fat. Plus, a medium avocado contains 40 percent of your daily fiber needs, is naturally sodium and cholesterol-free, and is a good source of lutein, an antioxidant that may protect your vision. Try enjoying it in place of foods that are higher in less healthy saturated fat - use 1/5 of a medium avocado to replace the mayo on your sandwich, the butter on your toast, or the sour cream on your baked potato. Keep in mind that they’re pretty high in calories, so you generally want to stick to no more than 1/4 an avocado at a time

2. Walnuts


Walnuts are one of the best sources of omega 3 fatty acids, specifically alpha linoleic acid, an omega-3 found in plants. A recent study linked a handful per day to lower total cholesterol and LDL cholesterol as well as improved blood vessel function. Research has also shown that eating nuts appears to reduce the risk of blood clots that can cause heart attacks as well as improve the health of the lining of our arteries

3. Other Nuts, like Almonds and Pistachios


Nuts like pecans, pistachios, cashews, and almonds also pack a lot of healthy fats. Almonds are the richest in vitamin E, and pistachios have lutein and zeaxanthin, carotenoids important for health but more importantly Eye health. All you need to eat is a 1/4 cup serving per day to reap the benefits. Some varieties are fattier than others, like cashews and macademia nuts, so you need to pay closer attention to serving sizes. (Nuts have, on average, 45 grams of fat per cup.) Nutritionists love pistachios because the fact that you have to shell them helps you eat slower and naturally control portion size. The peanut (technically a legume) contains monounsaturated fats but all of its polyunsaturated fats are omega-6s, which evidence suggests may not do us any favors.

4. Nut and Seed Butters


An easier way to get all the fatty goodness of nuts may be from a nut or seed butter. Try almond and cashew, or sunflower seed butter, for a plant-based dose of monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats. All you need is 2 tablespoons - spread it on toast, or eat it with fresh apple slices. Choose all-natural nut butters with as few ingredients as possible

5. Olives


One cup of black olives has 15 grams of fat, but again, it is mainly monounsaturated. Plus, no matter what variety of olive you enjoy, they all contain many other beneficial nutrients as well, such as hydroxytyrosol, a phytonutrient that has long been linked to cancer prevention. New research is showing that this phytonutrient may play a role in reducing bone loss as well. And if you have allergies or other inflammatory conditions, olives might be just the snack for you as research suggests that olive extracts function as anti-histamines on the cellular level. Even with all these benefits, it is important to be mindful of your serving size as olives can be high in sodium. Stick to 5 large or 10 small olives as the perfect portion.

6. Olive oil


It’s become the go-to cooking oil in many kitchens for a good reason as olive oil is full of monounsaturated fats. But don’t be too heavy-handed - just one tablespoon has 14 grams of fat

7. Ground Flaxseed


One cup of ground flaxseed has a whopping 48 grams of fat, but it's all healthy, unsaturated fat. And here's the thing, you only need 1-2 tablespoons to reap the benefits. Flaxseed is a great source of omega-3 fatty acids, too, so ground flaxseed is a great way for vegetarians (or those who don't eat fish) to meet their need. Also, flaxseed contains up to 800 times more lignans than other plant foods. These plant nutrients contain both plant estrogen and antioxidant properties, and research suggests that they may help prevent certain types of cancer. Last, but not least, flaxseed contains both insoluble and soluble fiber, so it can help you feel fuller longer as well as reduce cholesterol and promote heart health. Sprinkle a little bit on yogurt or oatmeal, or scoop a spoonful into a smoothie

8. Salmon


Oily fish like salmon and sardines, mackerel, and trout are full of omega-3 fatty acids, and known to help boost heart health. It's one of the best ways to get the essential fat. The Heart Association recommends eating at least two servings weekly to get the best benefits

9. Tuna


Tuna also packs a high amount of healthy fats and omega-3s. We're talking both the conveniently canned stuff and the kind you find at your favorite sushi spot. It's versatile—tuna steaks, tuna burgers, tuna salad, the options are endless—so it's pretty easy to fit into your diet.

10. Dark Chocolate


Yes, that’s right. One ounce (about 3 fingers' worth) of dark chocolate counts as one serving and contains about 9 grams of fat. About half of its fat content is saturated, but it also contains healthy fats and numerous other healthy nutrients—vitamins A, B, and E, calcium, iron, potassium, magnesium, and flavonoids (plant-based antioxidants). And did you know a 1-ounce portion of dark chocolate also boasts 3 grams of fiber? Practically a vegetable. Aim for a cocoa content of at least 70 percent for the highest levels of flavonoids.

11. Tofu


It’s not as high in fat as the other foods on this list, but tofu is still a good source of monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats. A modest, 3-ounce portion of super firm tofu contains 5 to 6 grams of fat and about 1 gram of saturated fat, but this is naturally-occurring fat from the soybeans, and tofu is considered a health food for a reason. It's a solid plant-based protein that’s low in sodium and provides nearly a quarter of your daily calcium needs

12. Edamame


Full of both polyunsaturated and monounsaturated fats, soybeans are also a great source of plant-based protein and fiber. Enjoy them boiled and salted as a tasty and filling snack, or puree it into a green-hued twist on your usual hummus

13. Sunflower Seeds


Sprinkle them on top of your salad, or eat a small handful, for a mega dose of healthy fats, protein, and fiber

14. Chia Seeds


These small but mighty seeds are loaded with omega-3s, fiber, protein, essential minerals, and antioxidants. Their popularity as a superfood is well deserved—you can toss a tablespoon into your smoothies for a quick fat, fiber, and protein boost, or soak them overnight for a ready when you wake up breakfast. You can even use them to add nutritional punch to your desserts

15. Eggs


Eggs are an inexpensive and easy source of protein. People often think egg whites are a healthier option than whole eggs because they contain less fat, but while it's true that the egg yolk contains some fat, it's also packed with important nutrients. One whole egg contains 5 grams of fat, but only 1.5 grams are saturated. Whole eggs are also a good source of choline (one egg yolk has about 300 micrograms), an important B vitamin that helps regulate the brain, nervous system, and cardiovascular system. As for the cholesterol? The latest nutrition research has found that eating cholesterol doesn't raise our blood cholesterol. In fact, research has linked moderate egg consumption to improved heart health

The following foods are higher in saturated fat and should be eaten more sparingly, but can be part of a healthy diet

16. Lean grass-fed beef and pork


Often thought of as a high-fat food, steak is actually not as high in fat as you may think, particularly if you choose one of these lean cuts, which have 5 grams of fat and less than 2 grams of saturated fat per 3-ounce serving, on average. What's more, lean beef is an excellent source of protein, iron, and zinc, all important nutrients for active women. One 3 ounce portion of lean beef packs a whopping 25 grams of muscle-building protein, three times the iron (which is important for carrying the oxygen in your blood to your brain and muscles) of 1 cup of spinach, and a third of your daily zinc needs to help support your immune system. Lean cuts of pork, like pork tenderloin, can also be a good source of fat when eaten in moderation. Cured and processed pork, like bacon, often contains loads of sodium and other preservatives like nitrates (which have been linked to increased heart disease and cancer risk), so they're not the healthiest way to consume the other white meat

17. Full Fat Milk


Research is starting to suggest that consuming full fat dairy products over low fat or fat free ones may have weight-control benefits. It may even help reduce type 2 diabetes risk. One cup (8 ounces/250ml) of whole milk contains 8 grams of fat with 5 grams saturated fat versus skimmed milk, which contains none of either. Other proponents of keeping the fat in dairy products point out that you need fat to absorb the vitamin A and D in the milk, since they are fat-soluble vitamins

18. Full Fat Yogurt


When you're shopping for yogurt, make sure to buy one that contains active cultures to reap the gut health benefits. And opt for a plain option over fruit flavored as they tend to pack an astounding amount of added sugar. Feel free to toss in some heart-healthy nuts and some fresh fruit though!

19. Parmesan Cheese


Cheese often gets a bad rap for being a high fat food, especially hard, full fat cheeses like Parmesan. While it is true that cheeses have more saturated fats than plant based foods, they (especially Parmesan, which contains 8 grams fat and 5 grams saturated fat per ounce), provide loads of other nutrients as well. In fact, Parmesan tops the cheese charts in terms of its bone building calcium content, providing nearly a third of your daily calcium needs. Ounce for ounce, it has more protein than any other food and yes, we are including meat and eggs on that list!

We hope this list of fats has given you some food for thought on incoporating some of these fats into your diet.  Don't forget, if you are an LED Unlimited Member, Nutrition Advice is included in your membership, simply contact your local centre here and ask for an appointment with your Fitness Instructor!

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